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Tue, Mar 12

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Facebook and Youtube Livestream

MACRI Talk: The Black Freedom Struggle and the United Farm Workers

Learn about the multiracial coalitions formed between the United Farm Workers and five Black civil rights organizations to protest the exploitation of Mexican American farmworkers in California in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

MACRI Talk: The Black Freedom Struggle and the United Farm Workers
MACRI Talk: The Black Freedom Struggle and the United Farm Workers

Time & Location

Mar 12, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM CDT

Facebook and Youtube Livestream

Guests

About the event

Join us for a VIRTUAL MACRI Talk with Dr. Lauren Araiza about the multiracial coalitions formed between the United Farm Workers and five Black civil rights organizations to protest the exploitation of Mexican American farmworkers in California in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Our FREE virtual event will stream live on Facebook at https://bit.ly/FB-MACRI & YouTube at https://bit.ly/YT-MACRI on Tuesday, March 12, 2024 at 6PM Central Time. Just click on your preferred site to join the presentation at 6PM CT!

MACRI's programs are funded in part by the City of San Antonio Department of Arts & Culture, Bexar County, the Mellon Foundation, the John L. Santikos Charitable Foundation Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation, Wells Fargo, and individual donors like you! To learn more about future MACRI events and how to make a donation, please visit www.somosMACRI.org. Gracias!

ABOUT OUR GUEST

Dr. Lauren Araiza is an Assistant Professor of History and Black Studies at Denison University in Ohio. She teaches survey courses in African-American history and the U.S. since 1865. She also offers seminars on the Civil Rights Movement, the intellectual history of Black Power, the American West, and comparative social movements. Her other teaching interests include labor history, comparative race and ethnicity, and oral history.

Dr. Araiza’s first book, TO MARCH FOR OTHERS: THE BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE AND THE UNITED FARM WORKERS, was published in the fall of 2013 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Her book examines the complexities of multiracial coalition building in American social movements by examining the relationships between the major organizations of the Black freedom struggle and the UFW, a union of primarily Mexican American farm workers. Dr. Araiza has also published in the Journal of African American History and has contributed an essay to the edited collection, THE STRUGGLE IN BLACK AND BROWN: AFRICAN AMERICAN AND MEXICAN AMERICAN RELATIONS DURING THE CIVIL RIGHTS ERA (University of Nebraska Press, 2011).

Dr. Araiza received her B.A. from Williams College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

ABOUT THE TALK

In 1966, members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, an African American civil rights group with Southern roots, joined Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers union on its 250-mile march from Delano to Sacramento, California, to protest the exploitation of agricultural workers. The SNCC was not the only Black organization to support the UFW: later on, the NAACP, the National Urban League, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Black Panther Party backed UFW strikes and boycotts against California agribusiness throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s.

TO MARCH FOR OTHERS explores the reasons why Black activists, who were committed to their own fight for equality during this period, crossed racial, socioeconomic, geographic, and ideological divides to align themselves with a union of predominantly Mexican American farm workers in rural California. LAUREN ARAIZA considers the history, ideology, and political engagement of these five civil rights organizations, representing a broad spectrum of African American activism, and compares their attitudes and approaches to multiracial coalitions. Through their various relationships with the UFW, Araiza examines the dynamics of race, class, labor, and politics in twentieth-century freedom movements. The lessons in this eloquent and provocative study apply to a broader understanding of political and ethnic coalition building in the contemporary United States.

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